Dr Jocelyn Williams

Academic Director

 

Contact:
Phone: +64 9 368 4343 (ext.126)
Email: jocelynwilliams@icl.ac.nz

 

Qualifications

PhD Massey, MMgt (Distinction) Massey, PGDipBus & Admin Massey, DipTeaching Auckland College of Education (now University of Auckland), BA Massey.

 

Experience, interests and affiliations

My academic and professional background is in Communication Studies, which I love for its relevance to all other disciplines. My start as a professional was as a secondary school teacher with a background in the Arts; however it’s been in the higher education sector where I’ve found my passion for Communication and
for seeing students find their pathways in life. During many years at Unitec Institute of Technology I taught undergraduate and postgraduate degree students, was Head of Communication Studies and also Associate Professor. I’m a Past President of ANZCA (the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association), held a pro bono role as Chair of the Auckland Steering Group for Computers in Homes and currently I’m a member of the Community Trust Board for CUE Haven, a sustainability project in the Kaipara region. My professional development has been richly informed by membership of the PR Institute of NZ (PRINZ). I’ve supervised a number of Masters theses at Unitec, and currently I’m associate supervisor for a PhD in Science Communication at Otago University.
The only thing that really matters in life is doing the right thing, for the right reasons. I try to live this in all that I do.

 

Research Focus

My work has evolved from information gaps and the Digital Divide in New Zealand to the field of community informatics (the harnessing of ICT as solutions for community issues). Underlying my work is an interest in how communication is critical to resolving ‘gaps’ between groups in society. Collaborative projects in
community media, ethics in community research, and communicating science all fall within this interest. I’m now turning my attention to business informatics, especially the use of disruptive technologies in understandings of ‘value’, such as in cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, and the role played by trust in the rapidly
growing popularity of these new models. In this I’m collaborating with Dr Farkhondeh Hassandoust, an ICL colleague.

 

Teaching

Selected courses taught:

  • Business and Academic Writing
  • Communicating in Organisations
  • Communication Ethics
  • Industry Internship

In 2017 I will be teaching Level 9 Business Professionalism in ICLs new Master of Business Informatics degree.

 

Selected publications

Williams, J. E. (2017). Mapping community media impact: Iterative cycles, continuous review. Communication Research and Practice Special Issue: The Social Impact of Community Media, 3 (1), 74 – 91. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22041451.2016.1266582. Available http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/t3srnusqK6FGcZvusjBk/full

Williams, J. E. (2016). Framing participation in collaborative community media: The living community documentary series. Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics, 13 (2), 48-65.

Williams, J. E. (2014). New Zealand online: What’s happened to our Digital Strategy? In G. Dodson & E. Papoutsaki (Eds.), Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand: A collection of research essays (pp. 80 – 94). Auckland, New Zealand: Unitec ePress.

Williams, J. E. (2013). Social cohesion and free home internet in New Zealand. In A. Abdelaal (Ed.), Social and economic effects of community wireless networks and infrastructures. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Williams, J.E., & Craig, B. (2012). Research informing practice: Toward effective engagement in community ICT in New Zealand. Journal of Community Informatics, 7 (3).

Williams, J. E., Sligo, F. X., & Wallace, C. (2006). Free internet as an agent of community transformation. Journal of Community Informatics, 2(1), 53 – 67.

Sligo, F. X., & Williams, J. E. (1999). What does discussion do? Perspectives on public opinion and the formation of polarised viewpoints. Australian Journal of Communication, 26(3), 37-48.