InternetNZ funding grant to ICL Graduate Business School

ICL Graduate Business School, a private tertiary education provider based in Auckland’s CBD, has won a $15,000 research grant from the 2018 InternetNZ Research Community Grants Round. This is exciting news for the school, whose academic staff have been active in research supporting its postgraduate business programmes for some years, with creditable published outcomes.

The support of external funding is recognition of solid research quality and a big step forward for ICL’s research activities. The grant has been awarded to a project entitled Information Security Online: A Critical Evaluation of College Students’ Security Awareness in New Zealand, to be completed in 2018, focused on students’ information security awareness. The research is being led by Dr Ferry Hassandoust and Dr Jocelyn Williams, who see this as an important topic given the numbers of graduates set to join the IT and IS sectors in NZ and worldwide. What is their awareness of cybersecurity issues? What might the implications be for business?

Dr Ferry Hassandoust
Dr Jocelyn Williams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The project, closely aligned with the curriculum of ICL’s recently launched Master of Business Informatics (MBI) programme on which both Ferry and Jocelyn are teaching, focuses on evaluating the cybersecurity awareness and behaviours of ICL students. MBI students also play a role in this research through participating in the Information Security Management course in the MBI programme, and they will utilise methods to improve their information security awareness through training, workshops and other tactics to be developed on the basis of the research findings.

In other news recognising research quality, Dr Ferry Hassandoust has also been granted InternetNZ funding to travel to the Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (2018) in Japan, to present a paper. InternetNZ is a non-profit and open membership organisation. It promotes the Internet’s benefits and provides community funding to promote Internet research in order to shape what New Zealand’s Internet might look like in the future.